Home > Blog

Through the Looking-Glass sesquicentenary conference: call for papers

This November, a conference will take place to celebrate 150 years of “Through the Looking-Glass”. There is now a call for papers.

Block the 4th and 5th of November 2021 in your agenda for the Through the Looking-Glass Sesquicentenary Conference. It will be hosted by the University of York, but all talks and associated events will be held online.

The conference aims to explore the significance of the mirror in literature, science, theology, art and other fields, and any facets of this concept that were relevant to ideas that shaped Carroll’s work, or, which have since been integral to its interpretation at different points in time.

They are currently inviting presentations exploring the theme of mirrors, offering fresh approaches to any aspects of the work itself, addressing, in particular, the difference between Looking-Glass and Wonderland, or aspects of Lewis Carroll’s biography, his historical, literary, and epistemological environment, intertextualities with other authors, Carroll’s correspondents or wider circles, which promise to shed new light on his Looking-Glass world. Contributions can be a mixture of traditional academic papers and alternative formats.

More information about the call for papers, and later on event information, can be found on their website: https://throughthelookingglasssesquicentenary.wordpress.com/

Virtual LCSNA Spring Meeting

COVID-19 also brings us good things: The spring meeting of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America will be held online, so you can attend even when you don’t live in the US (and you don’t need to be a member either)!

Their extensive meeting programme with lectures, Q&A, and social time, fills two days: 23 and 24 April, starting on 9:30 until 6:30/5:00 (Pacific Daylight Time). You will need to register to be able to join, but it’s free of charge.

The programme and other details can be found on their site: https://www.lewiscarroll.org/event/lcsna-spring-2021-virtual-meeting/

Alice in Wonderland writing competition

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of “Through the Looking-Glass”, the Lewis Carroll Society is launching a writing competition!

The challenge: Write a ‘missing’ chapter for either “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” or “Through the Looking-Glass and what Alice found there”.

Closing date: July 3rd, 2021

Prizes: £100 for the winners of each of the three age groups (0-16 years, 16-20 year, 20+ years old), as well as Chris Riddell’s “Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There” book for the winners and runners-ups.

For rules and additional information, see: https://lewiscarrollsociety.org.uk/writing-competition/

Book: The Chess Player’s Alice

Do you want to know more about the chess game that forms the framework of “Through the Looking Glass and what Alice found there”? Then get this booklet, written by Rev. Ivor Davies, who had an interest in both chess and Lewis Carroll.

Reverend Davies’ interest in Lewis Carroll led him to write several articles about the chess game in ‘Through the Looking Glass’. These articles have now been bundled and republished by the Clergy Correspondence Chess Club, which Davies founded, in a book called “The Chess Player’s Alice”.

The Chess Player's Alice cover

Read full post >

Event: “Creating Wonderlands” online forum

This full day of online talks is organized by the V&A museum, and related to their grand “Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser” exhibition that will open later this year.

The ‘Alice’ stories have provided an enourmous source of inspiration and creativity. Speakers from across creative industries will share how they have reimagined, radicalised and revitalised Alice and her world. They will also discuss the question: “What will our next ‘Wonderland’ be?”

The full programme:

Read full post >

A Christmas Greeting

Lady dear, if Fairies may
For a moment lay aside
Cunning tricks and elfish play,
‘Tis at happy Christmas-tide.

We have heared the children say –
Gentle children, whom we love –
Long ago, on Christmas Day,
Came a message from above.

Still, as Christmas-tide comes round,
They remember it again –
Echo still the joyful sound,
‘Peace on earth, good-will to men.’

Yet the hearts must child-like be
Where such heavenly guests abide.
Unto children, in their glee,
All the year is Christmas-tide.

Thus, forgetting tricks and play
For a moment, Lady dear,
We would wish you, if we may,
Merry Christmas, glad New Year.

– Lewis Carroll